How to Prove Fault in a Car Accident

How to Prove Fault in a Car Accident

Steps to Holding Negligent Parties Accountable

If you sustained an injury in a car accident caused by the negligent or reckless actions of another driver, you should not have to suffer the financial burden. The responsible party is liable for all damages that he or she caused, including your medical bills, lost wages, and pain and suffering. Unfortunately, some parties are stubborn and refuse to admit their fault. Furthermore, the insurance provider of the liable party may use manipulative tactics in an effort to minimize the settlement they pay you and maximize their own profits.

This is where we come in. At Goldberg & Gille, we have a combined 80 years of experience practicing personal injury law and we know what it takes to prove fault in a car accident. Our Pasadena personal injury lawyers will do everything in our power to compile any and all relevant evidence and use it to build an aggressive and effective case to fight for maximum compensation. We will stop at nothing to help ensure that you get the financial support that you need and deserve so that you can move forward with your injury.

What do I do after a car accident?

While we have the resources and knowledge to build a case on your behalf, there are steps that you can take to help the process. The period of time immediately following the accident can be one of the most crucial times for proving liability, as it is an opportunity for you to gather information while it is still fresh. After an accident, the first step is to ensure that everyone is okay, and seek medical attention if necessary. If it seems that the other driver is not going to be cooperative or is intoxicated, call the police for assistance.

Immediately after an accident, make sure to get the following information:

  • Names, numbers, addresses of all parties involved
  • License plate number, driver's license number, and insurance information of all drivers involved
  • Names, numbers, and addresses of any witnesses
  • Police reports

Gathering witness testimony is often a step that people involved in accidents forget, but it can be essential evidence to use later on in your case. This step is especially important if the other driver seems combative or unwilling to cooperate; having a neutral, third party's opinion can make all the difference. Additionally, in the days and weeks following your accident, it is beneficial to make a note of all the consequences that your injury has had on your life.

Document the following implications:

  • Medical bills
  • Medical records
  • Days of work missed
  • Emotional trauma caused by injury
  • Special life events missed

Your records can help estimate the total cost that your injury has caused you, which will help prove to insurance adjusters the severity of the accident. Additionally, these records will help show that your life has dramatically changed since the car accident, which will be advantageous to you in the courtroom.

Goldberg & Gille Will Do the Rest

At our firm, our Pasadena car accident attorneys will do everything in our power to help you gather all necessary information in order to build a strong case against a negligent individual. We will thoroughly investigate and analyze the circumstances surrounding your accident to give you the best chance at recovering the financial support that you need. When you come to Goldberg & Gille, you can feel confident knowing that you have a supportive and trustworthy team of legal professionals in your corner.

The most important step is retaining an attorney you can trust. Call our firm today!

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Pasadena Family Law Attorney
131 N El Molino Ave, Suite 310A,
Pasadena, CA 91101 (View Map)
Phone: (626) 340-0955
Local: (626) 584-6700

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